‘Frosty Snowdrops’ with Salt.

Learners are having fun this ‘term’, using ‘Salt’ to create Texture in their Paintings, one learner could not resist scattering it around some Snowdrops, and here is the result.

20181102_121703

 

When adding Salt to Watercolour, it is important to practice it first, watch how the salt works differently, on the varying stages of wet paint.

20181102_121703

The wetter the paint the larger the effects are.

20181102_121703

Mid sheen wetness, gives smaller speckles.

20181102_121703

A touch over salted – not much room to flow.

You can either use Fine Table Salt or Rock Salt, table salt generally gives, smaller speckles, where as rock salt will create much larger effects.  You could always use a salt grinder, with rock salt to give varying degrees of speckles.  Whichever you use, Don’t Rush the drying process with forced heat, as it will stop the salt working too quickly.  Let it dry naturally and you will be amazed at how it changes during the drying process.

Advertisements

‘Frosty Snowdrops’ with Salt.

Learners are having fun this ‘term’, using ‘Salt’ to create Texture in their Paintings, one learner could not resist scattering it around some Snowdrops, and here is the result.

20181102_121703

 

When adding Salt to Watercolour, it is important to practice it first, watch how the salt works differently, on the varying stages of wet paint.

20181102_121703

The wetter the paint the larger the effects are.

20181102_121703

Mid sheen wetness, gives smaller speckles.

20181102_121703

A touch over salted – not much room to flow.

You can either use Fine Table Salt or Rock Salt, table salt generally gives, smaller speckles, where as rock salt will create much larger effects.  You could always use a salt grinder, with rock salt to give varying degrees of speckles.  Whichever you use, Don’t Rush the drying process with forced heat, as it will stop the salt working too quickly.  Let it dry naturally and you will be amazed at how it changes during the drying process.

‘Creative Watercolour Techniques’ Workshop 8th July 2017

If you have ever fancied being more creative with your watercolours, then this workshop is a must for you.

Enjoy a Fun Day Experimenting with Texture in Watercolour.  A chance to discover a more expressive style, exploring a variety of materials and equipment to create texture in your watercolours or simply just have fun!

Sun Highlight

Tutor: Yvette Wiltshire

Date: Saturday 8th July 2017

Time: 10am to 4pm.

Price: £30 (£5 Deposit)

Venue: Bodmin. Unit 4, Woods Browning Industrial Estate, Respryn Road.  Cornwall. PL31 1DQ.

You will need to bring some minor materials and equipment; a list will be available on booking.

Refreshments:  Please bring a packed lunch.

Contact me to book your space by email: yvettewiltshire@sky.com

Via my websiteArt with Yvette

or Phone: 07886 343621

P1060213

P1060277a

 

 

‘Creative Watercolour Techniques’ Workshop

If you have ever fancied being more creative with your watercolours, then this workshop is a must for you.

Enjoy a Fun Day Experimenting with Texture in Watercolour.  A chance to discover a more expressive style, exploring a variety of materials and equipment to create texture in your watercolours or simply just have fun!

Sun Highlight

Tutor: Yvette Wiltshire

Date: Saturday 8th July 2017

Time: 10am to 4pm.

Price: £30 (£5 Deposit)

Venue: Bodmin. Unit 4, Woods Browning Industrial Estate, Respryn Road.  Cornwall. PL31 1DQ.

You will need to bring some minor materials and equipment; a list will be available on booking.

Refreshments:  Please bring a packed lunch.

Contact me to book your space by email: yvettewiltshire@sky.com

Via my websiteArt with Yvette

or Phone: 07886 343621

P1060213

P1060277a

 

 

Salt Techniques with Watercolour

In the last session of term (March 2017) at Menheniot we practiced Salt techniques.   (See Salt Techniques below)  This is always a fun session, as its always a surprise to see just how the salt works on different stages of the wet paint as its drying.   One very new learner to painting, shows it does work and its a joy to see a learner smile and go home pleased with their work.

It really is great to see how an absolute new beginner to watercolour, improve in just a short time.  ‘Pat’ has only been painting for 1 term (10 Weeks), and has had a steep ladder to climb as she paints alongside learners that have been coming to class for many years.

P1150426

Winter Wonderland by ‘Pat Brunskill’

Salt Techniques:

  • Make sure your ‘salt’ is dry, if necessary warm it in an oven or stand next to a heater for a while, alternatively, store in an airing cupboard.  This will help to make the salt work at its best.
  • Salt absorbs the moisture but repels the pigment of the watercolour to create ‘blooms’
  • The watercolour wash has to be still wet but not too shiny.
  • The effect varies depending on the wetness of the wash and the size of the salt grains.  The wetter the watercolour surface the larger the reactions will be.
  • Add sprinkles of salt, but don’t mound the salt as this wont give you very good results.  Less is more.
  • When its dry, which can take a while, brush it off.
  • If it has not worked, it could because the was on the paper was too dry, the salt was damp, or the watercolour wash was overworked into the paper allowing little movement of the colour.
  • Practice beforehand to get the actual results you want.

Here are a few other paintings from learners at the Bodmin Watercolour Class.

P1150409P1150410P1150412P1150413P1150411

Happy New Year

Happy New Year to You All.

New Years Resolutions are always hard to keep, from eating less chocolate or drinking less alcohol to getting fitter and eating more healthier.  Mine, as I am sure many of yours, flounder after a few weeks of good intentions.

We should be more realistic and make a resolution for something that we enjoy doing, like…

Painting more between classes, sketch each day or every other day perhaps, or just to try to slow down when we start painting, and think more about the process, and not trying to get to the finish too quickly and become disappointed with the end result.  Trying to understand why things happen and allow yourself time to practice it again to improve it.

One of the things that is asked many times in class, is how do I mix this colour?  Why is my colour mucky? why are my colours different to the ones you mix? and so on.

Colour Mixing is an art in itself, and one not to be dismissed too quickly. Knowing your colours and how to create glowing, clean watercolours, are an essential part of painting and making your work stand out proud.

I enjoy colour mixing, the challenge of getting the colour right by mixing with a limited palette from blue, red and yellow, the 3 primary colours rather than from a pre-mixed colour that you can buy.

Greens are particularly difficult to get just so, some pre mixed greens are not natural at all, and many greens that are more natural have only been made from the colours you have in your everyday colour palette.

If you are struggling with colours and want to create better mixes and understand your colour palette better why not attend my ‘Colour Mixing Skills in Watercolour’ Workshop on the 17th January at Cartwheels Craft Centre, Merrymeet.

Start the New Year Off getting to grips with colour mixing and enjoy the rest of the year producing better results and have a better understanding of colour.

Spaces are limited so please contact me, or Julia at Cartwheels soon.

Email: cartwheelscraftcentre@hotmail.co.uk
Tel: 01579 343675P1100864

Dry Brush Technique

In this weeks classes we have been working on Boats, and some of the images used to work from have been on Water or on Sand or Low Tidal Mud either in a harbour or river.  The following Step by Step Guide to achieving Dry Brush Effects for Water will be useful for Boats on Water as per the following Painting:

Me-an-der

A Boat named ‘Me-an-der’ on Water by Yvette Wiltshire

Dry Brush Step by Step Guide

  1. Mix your paint Different Directional Strokes (8)
  2. Dab off excess paint onto kitchen roll
  3. Dab offLay the Brush flat on the paper and drag sideways, if you have too much paint in your brush you won’t have gaps in paper like thisRough Paper (1)
  4. Dab off your brush and try again, see how the second row is much drier lookingRough Paper (2)
  5. The next row is even drierRough Paper (3)
  6. Different Paper will also play a part in getting good effects, it works very well on a rough surface and you can achieve a good dry brush result on a less textured paper but you will need to vary the amount of paint left in the brush.  Always test first on a scrap of paper making sure you use the same texture as the paper you are working on.   The following images show different examples of varying surface textures:
  7. Khadi Paper – Heavy Texture
  8. Different Directional Strokes (10)Khadi Paper – Heavy TextureDifferent Directional Strokes (12)
  9. A ‘Not’ Surface – Medium Texture with 2 layers of different Blue appliedDifferent Directional Strokes (15)
  10. Semi Smooth PaperSmoother Paper  (3)
  11. The 3 different surfaces compared Different Directional Strokes (7)
  12. Using a more vertical stroke of Dry Brush to get different effects, like grass.   Different Directional Strokes (4)
  13. Different Directional Strokes (2)A Further Layer of a darker Green added and I have some brown that could be earth using a sideways brush stroke.Different Directional Strokes (5)
  14. Or Water?
  15. Different Directional Strokes (1)Dry Brush Work was used to achieve the textures on the mountains in the following image.KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA
  16. And the textures of the rocks in the following image.Moorland View
  17. Hopefully, you are now ready to have a go yourselves.

Previous Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: